Procedures

ATI Inspector Form

Aerodrome Technical Inspection (ATI) Inspector Qualification & Experience Validation Form Very few aerodromes I visit take the time to make sure the person or persons who carry out their aerodrome technical inspections meet the qualification and experience requirements laid out in CASR 139.240.

Operations under a safety management system typically demand a higher level of assurance than has existed in the past. You can't rely on tradition or past conduct - you have to examine and re-examine your decisions regularly - its part of the safety assurance, change management and continuous improvement components of a good safety management system.

To assist with making the assessment of a potential ATI Inspector, I've put together this simple form to show how a conscientious aerodrome operator might record such an assessment. The process involves the aerodrome operator seeking evidence (degrees, resumés, references) from the inspector and then either accepting or rejecting this evidence based on the regulatory requirements.

Please feel free to take this form, change it, incorporate it into your manual (or not). Whatever you do, please do something and make sure its recorded. We auditors are a cynical bunch, for us - if it ain't recorded, it didn't happen.

"a sweep of the runway collected more than 20 bird carcasses"

I spied a couple of news reports of a mass bird-strike at DFW Airport today and the above quote jumped out at me. The procedure for checking the runway following a bird-strike is not required under Australian regulations and is not always included in the aerodrome manual - despite being a really, very, really good idea. In this instance there were no injuries although there was some damage to the aircraft. But the concern is not the struck aircraft, it's what's left on the runway. Twenty dead birds present an attractive meal for a predator or scavenger (including domestic animals) and any aircraft debris is also a hazard to other aircraft.